The student news site of Glenbard South High School in Glen Ellyn, Illinois

The Independent

The student news site of Glenbard South High School in Glen Ellyn, Illinois

The Independent

The student news site of Glenbard South High School in Glen Ellyn, Illinois

The Independent

The Wizard of Oz: Interviews with the Cast
Olivia Abbott and Aniyah NelsonApril 7, 2024

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AP Announces New African American Studies Course

Source%3A+Photo+by+Clarisse+Meyer+on+Unsplash
Source: Photo by Clarisse Meyer on Unsplash

In the spring of 2025, all high schools in the United States will be able to offer AP African American Studies. According to AP Central, this course teaches students history stretching from early African kingdoms to the ongoing achievements and struggles of African Americans today. It develops students’ abilities in a wide array of areas, including historical, literary, visual and analysis skills.

As stated by AP Central, the initial trial of AP African American Studies was in the 2022-2023 school year, involving 60 schools across the United States. Last year, the pilot program grew to almost 700 American schools. Finally, in the spring of 2025, this course will be available to all high schools in the United States. This course will not only be rigorous, but the most immersive course about African American history that high school students have ever had access to. 

In the course, students will learn about history through many perspectives. “If the students take this course, they will leave with a much better understanding of the American story,” said Emmitt Glynn III, an AP Instructor, in a College Board video interview. He continued, “They will leave with a new appreciation for all of the cultures that literally came together to produce what we call modern day African American culture.” In the same interview, Trinity E, an AP student, agreed, ”It’s not like your average history class, so you won’t be hearing things from just a one-sided perspective. You hear everything from every perspective.”

This course is not only beneficial for students, but for teachers as well. ‘I jumped at the chance to be able to teach this course because this is my subject area,’” said Patrice Fraiser, an AP Instructor, in the same interview. “And I think it gives people more confidence once they teach this course, to also maybe delve into other AP courses to teach. And as a result, you will see more students who look like them taking the course,” Fraiser elaborated. 

“It is adding to the history of this country. It’s bringing that kind of hidden history up to the forefront,” said Nelva Williamson, an AP Instructor, in the same interview.

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Lizzie Pekkarinen
Lizzie Pekkarinen, School News Editor
My name is Lizzie Pekkarinen and I am a sophomore and a writer for School News. Outside of Newspaper I am involved with Future Teachers, Best Buddies, Theater, and French Club. In my free time you can find me drawing, or reading.  

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